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Monster

Paperback
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Description

Some monsters are real.

Miles away from the hectic city, Reed and Rebecca hike into the beautiful Northwester woods. They are surrounded by gorgeous mountains, waterfalls, and hundreds of acres of unspoiled wilderness.

During their first night camping, an unearthly wail pierces the calm of the forest. Then something emerges from the dense woods. Everything that follows is a blur to Reed—except the unforgettable image of a huge creature carrying his wife into the darkness.

Enter into deep wilderness where the rules of civilization no longer apply. A world where strange shadows lurk. Where creatures long attributed to overactive imaginations and nightmares are the hunters . . .and people are the hunted.

Reading Guides

Reading Group Guide

  1. Before you began the novel, who or what did you think the title referred to? Who or what is the real monster Peretti is referring to?
     
  2. Monster looks at the question of beneficial mutations and whether there really is such a thing as a "beneficial" mutation. What were your thoughts about mutations before you read this novel? Have your thoughts changed at all? What questions have arisen in your mind?
     
  3. Many of us were taught certain things about evolution in high school and college. What are some of the "facts" about evolution that you assume are true because you've heard them all your life? What proof have you actually seen for these "facts"?
     
  4. At the beginning of the novel Beck is worried about checking her makeup and ensuring that she has her hairbrush and compact. By the end, though, she has covered herself in mud, brush, and dung in order to survive in the animal world. Why are the proprieties of human society not the norm in the animal world? What do you think is indicated by the fact that Rachel and Leah are so fascinated by Beck's hairbrush?
     
  5. In order to protect his theory, Burkhardt must eliminate all witnesses. He justifies this by saying it is part of the natural process, but in reality he has reverted to a savage animal himself with no rules, no propriety, and no morality. Is this the logical outcome of evolution?
     
  6. Throughout the novel Jimmy is convinced that they are searching for a bear-even when the footprints are much too large to belong to a bear, even when the footprints prove that the creature moves on two feet instead of four and must have been carrying Beck, and even when the stool samples that are recovered are genetically proven to contain human and chimp DNA. What things do you believe in spite of strong evidence to the contrary? Are there times when you should reconsider your position based on the evidence?
     
  7. For a moment, try to put aside all your feelings about the existence of sasquaches or "Big Foot." What facts can you know or do you know about them? What information is presented in the novel? If our culture did not present them as nothing more than a myth, what might you believe about them? Are there any other things you might believe if society did not assign them the stigma of being myths?
     
  8. What is it about "myths"-sasquaches, the Loch Ness monster, UFOs-that is so intriguing?
     
  9. In Monster, sasquaches are treated as real animals and not as cartoon or King Kong prototypes. Do you agree with this treatment? What effect does it have on the story?
     
  10. The sasquaches are seen as monsters at first because they are unknown, but the more time Beck spends with them and gets to know them, the less monstrous they become. How does knowledge empower her? How does this principle apply to everyday situations?
     
  11. Monster is written from a cinematic, screenplay approach. We learn about the characters from watching how they react in different situations. Why do you think Peretti choose this approach, rather than a more literary writing style, to convey this story?
     
  12. Through the trials she experiences, Beck learns that she must take responsibility and rise above her situation in order to survive. What do you think you would learn about yourself if you were to have Beck's experience with the sasquaches? What would you learn if you experienced Reed's role in the story? Cap's?
     
  13. Has this novel raised any questions about sasquaches and myths that you had not previously considered? What advantage to do see to thinking about an issue from a new perspective?
     
  14. Are you afraid to be out in the woods at night?

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Monster, Frank Peretti

Details

Some monsters are real.

Miles away from the hectic city, Reed and Rebecca hike into the beautiful Northwester woods. They are surrounded by gorgeous mountains, waterfalls, and hundreds of acres of unspoiled wilderness.

During their first night camping, an unearthly wail pierces the calm of the forest. Then something emerges from the dense woods. Everything that follows is a blur to Reed—except the unforgettable image of a huge creature carrying his wife into the darkness.

Enter into deep wilderness where the rules of civilization no longer apply. A world where strange shadows lurk. Where creatures long attributed to overactive imaginations and nightmares are the hunters . . .and people are the hunted.

More Information

Length 464 Pages
Publication Date March 7, 2006
Company
  • Thomas Nelson
ISBN-10 1595541527
ISBN-13 9781595541529
Height 8.38"
Width 5.5"